Posts tagged Charlotte Bronte

I don’t think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre.

Tell him, Jane!  (via hopefullywildeandfree)

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I had wrought hard to extirpate from my soul the germs of love there detected; and now, at the first renewed view of him, they spontaneously revived, great and strong! He made me love him without looking at me.
Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte (via thefantasticalimpractical)

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I had a theoretical reverence and homage for beauty, elegance, gallantry, fascination; but had I met those qualities incarnate in masculine shape, I should have known instinctively that they neither had nor could have sympathy with anything in me, and should have shunned them as one would fire, lightning, or anything else that is bright but antipathetic.
Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre (via abscondita)

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Not many months ago, the New England States were visited by a distressing mental epidemic, passing under the name of the “Jane Eyre fever” … The hero, Mr. Rochester … became a great favorite in the boarding-schools and in the worshipful society of governesses. That portion of Young America known as ladies’ men began to swagger and swear in the presence of the gentler sex, and to allude darkly to events in their lives which excused impudence and profanity.
“Novels of the Season” by E. P. Whittle, North American Review, October 1848 (via a-wild-condorcet-appears)

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celestialmazer:

Julia Callon - Houses of Fiction

Artist Statement: Houses of Fiction

       ‘Whether domestic spaces are depicted as places of confinement or refuge, the private sphere is an evident preoccupation for many nineteenth-century female writers. Often a reflection of women’s ‘place’ in society, the stories depicted in this series demonstrate the metaphorical and literal significance of space. Borrowing partially from literary criticism, this series attempts to synthesize ideas and images through the process of interpretation and adaptation. In each of the five selected stories conventional notions of womanhood are undermined, inciting conflict and eventually ‘madness’ - this tension is implicit in each of the narratives examined.
        The dichotomous representation of women - mad or sane - is crucial to represent in this series. Therefore, each story is presented as a diptych: one image represents the passive, subservient woman, while the other image represents ‘madness’. The first image is literal and based on the emphatic description of space in the individual stories. Alternatively, the representation of the maddening consequence of confinement.

http://www.juliacallon.com

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nailsense:

Jane Eyre nails! This week is the anniversary of its publication. 

nailsense:

Jane Eyre nails! This week is the anniversary of its publication. 

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maglorious:

i’m never going to be able to finish reading jane eyre. every time i read it i am so in awe of how charlotte bronte writes that i am always reluctant to move forward with the text for fear that i’ll forget something that i was particularly impressed with. her sentence structure is so sharp and…

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idlesuperstar:


His face was very much agitated and very much flushed, and there were strong workings in the features, and strange gleams in the eyes.
“Oh, Jane, you torture me!” he exclaimed. “With that searching and yet faithful and generous look, you torture me!”
“How can I do that? If you are true, and your offer real, my only feelings to you must be gratitude and devotion—they cannot torture.”
“Gratitude!” he ejaculated; and added wildly—“Jane accept me quickly. Say, Edward—give me my name—Edward—I will marry you.”
“Are you in earnest? Do you truly love me? Do you sincerely wish me to be your wife?”
“I do; and if an oath is necessary to satisfy you, I swear it.”
“Then, sir, I will marry you.”
“Edward—my little wife!”
“Dear Edward!”
“Come to me—come to me entirely now,” said he; and added, in his deepest tone, speaking in my ear as his cheek was laid on mine, “Make my happiness—I will make yours.”
“God pardon me!” he subjoined ere long; “and man meddle not with me: I have her, and will hold her.”
“There is no one to meddle, sir. I have no kindred to interfere.”
“No—that is the best of it,” he said. And if I had loved him less

Charlotte Brontë’s fair copy of Jane Eyre, written out by hand between 16-19 March 1847 to be sent for publication. 

idlesuperstar:

His face was very much agitated and very much flushed, and there were strong workings in the features, and strange gleams in the eyes.

“Oh, Jane, you torture me!” he exclaimed. “With that searching and yet faithful and generous look, you torture me!”

“How can I do that? If you are true, and your offer real, my only feelings to you must be gratitude and devotion—they cannot torture.”

“Gratitude!” he ejaculated; and added wildly—“Jane accept me quickly. Say, Edward—give me my name—Edward—I will marry you.”

“Are you in earnest? Do you truly love me? Do you sincerely wish me to be your wife?”

“I do; and if an oath is necessary to satisfy you, I swear it.”

“Then, sir, I will marry you.”

“Edward—my little wife!”

“Dear Edward!”

“Come to me—come to me entirely now,” said he; and added, in his deepest tone, speaking in my ear as his cheek was laid on mine, “Make my happiness—I will make yours.”

“God pardon me!” he subjoined ere long; “and man meddle not with me: I have her, and will hold her.”

“There is no one to meddle, sir. I have no kindred to interfere.”

“No—that is the best of it,” he said. And if I had loved him less

Charlotte Brontë’s fair copy of Jane Eyre, written out by hand between 16-19 March 1847 to be sent for publication. 

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Update on prequel to JANE EYRE

janerochesternovel:

F.Y.I.

Unexpected delays will push the ebook publication of THE JOURNAL OF JANE REED EYRE back to early summer, 2013.  

Premise:  The story of Jane Eyre’s parents is revealed through the journal of Jane’s mother, Jane Reed, an affluent regency beauty.  She weds Matthew Eyre, a poor clergyman, against the protests of her family and friends.  Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre never knew the full story of her parents’ situation—thanks to the jealousy of her Aunt Sarah Reed.  Faithfully adapted characters from Jane Eyre come to life again in THE JOURNAL OF JANE REED EYRE as well as characters that Jane Eyre was not able to meet due to distance and death.  I look forward to introducing you to the carefully researched and imaginatively explored origins of one of literature’s most beloved characters.  

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